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Crowne Plaza New Orleans-Airport

2829 Williams Blvd, Kenner, LA 70062

While the impending change holds great promise, the patterns of consumption, production and employment created by it also pose major challenges requiring proactive adaptation by corporations, governments and individuals. Concurrent to the technological revolution are a set of broader socio-economic, geopolitical and demographic drivers of change, each interacting in multiple directions and intensifying one another. As entire industries adjust, most occupations are undergoing a fundamental transformation. While some jobs are threatened by redundancy and others grow rapidly, existing jobs are also going through a change in the skill sets required to do them. The debate on these transformations is often polarized between those who foresee limitless new opportunities and those that foresee massive dislocation of jobs.

Agenda

Panel

Thursday, August 31
8:30-9:00 Coffee and Breakfast
9:00-9:30 Rene Rosenthal – Opening Purpose and Why
9:30-10:00 Panel 1: “Innovation in Leadership”
10:00-10:15 Panel Q&A
10:15 – 10:30 Break
10:30-11:00 Panel 2: “The Future of Jobs”
11:00 – 11:15 Panel Q&A
11:15 – 1:00 Lunch
1:00 – 1:30 Panel 3: “Startups in Tech World”
1:30 – 1:45 Panel Q&A
1:45 – 2:00 Break
2:00 – 2:30 Panel 4: “Concept to Launch”
2:30 – 2:45 Panel Q&A
2:45 – 3:00 Break
3:00 – 3:30 Panel 5: “Women in Technology”
3:30 – 3:45 Panel Q&A
3:45 – 5:00 Networking

Not long ago, strategy was king. Forecasting, planning, and placing smart bets created the power sources within organizations. The future of a business (or a career) could fit into an established framework or system. If managed well, success would follow.

Today, uncertainty is palpable. Planning for next quarter is a challenge. Even more difficult is committing to decisions that will play out in one to five years. What is the new process, the innovative product, the game-changing service, or the compelling vision? In the words of one senior executive:

“We’ve lost our crystal ball.”

While the impending change holds great promise, the patterns of consumption, production and employment created by it also pose major challenges requiring proactive adaptation by corporations, governments and individuals. Concurrent to the technological revolution are a set of broader socio-economic, geopolitical and demographic drivers of change, each interacting in multiple directions and intensifying one another. As entire industries adjust, most occupations are undergoing a fundamental transformation. While some jobs are threatened by redundancy and others grow rapidly, existing jobs are also going through a change in the skill sets required to do them. The debate on these transformations is often polarized between those who foresee limitless new opportunities and those that foresee massive dislocation of jobs.

Global economies are on the cusp of a ‘third-wave industrial revolution

in which enterprising, young innovators will play a central role .The rise of ‘micro-multinationals’ – start-ups which operate across high- and low-cost locations, delivering

to an international customer base – exemplifies the opportunities wrought by globalization, digital communications and the internet. The challenges for business leaders and policymakers are to empower such opportunities for entrepreneurs and to foster domestic and international innovation ecosystems, while mitigating an increasingly dysfunctional global labour market.

The high-technology field has long been pegged as one that is inhospitable to women because it has been—and continues to be—dominated numerically by men. Common wisdom and previous research suggested that the barriers to advancement that women in technology companies faced and the experiences that they had as a result of the male dominance and pervasively masculine culture of the field led to dissatisfaction among women employees. Moreover, among women in technical jobs, dissatisfaction and disenchantment were found to be especially acute. In recent years, however, the climate for women in technology companies has begun to change. With a very robust market for jobs in information technology, companies have had to respond to employees’ demands for better working environments. Indeed, companies have found themselves in competition to attract and retain highly qualified talent—including women and men.

Successful new product development (NPD) is a critical cornerstone of firm success Significant incentives exist for firms to continuously introduce viable new products to the markets they serve. The financial payoff from successful new product introductions can help many firms overcome the slowing growth and profitability of existing products and services that are approaching the maturity stages of their life cycles.  New product development can also be a potential source of significant economies of scale for the firm. Furthermore, new product development can be an important source of leverage for the firm to use in its relationships with its distribution channel partners. Firms that have multiple successful products in their portfolios can command greater attention and priority treatment, such as preferred shelf space and payment terms, from wholesalers and retailers. This is a particularly important consideration given the fact that large retailers, such as Wal-Mart and Target, have evolved into positions of significant channel power and influence. Furthermore, the image and reputation of the firm and its brands is heavily influenced by the number and caliber of successful products in its portfolio.

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